Better Online Security (Not a New Year’s Resolution)

Figure 1: Attribution: Free for commercial use, No attribution required , via Pixabay I’m not making a New Year’s resolution though it appears to be suspiciously close to the beginning of the year. I’ve decided to take my online privacy and security a little more seriously. Recently, I listened to a podcast called IRL (specifically, Season 4, Episode 2 “Your Password Is the Worst”). It

Gopher – The Other Web

Figure 1: My Gopher Hole as seen on DiggieDog Attribution: By bradfonseca (Own work) Sometimes one goes down a rabbit hole investigating something and ends up somewhere they don’t expect. In this case, it’s actually a gopher hole but the end result is the same: a rapidly spinning propellor on my nerd beanie. I made a couple pretty interesting (at least to me!) discoveries over

Restoring Privacy of Personal Data: Richard Stallman’s Article in The Guardian

Figure 1: ‘Convenient digital payment systems can also protect passengers’ anonymity and privacy.’ Photograph: Debra Hurford Brown/PA I like reading The Guardian and I like articles by Richard Stallman. Imagine my surprise to see an article on The Guardian written by Richard Stallman! It actually turns out that he has written for them a few times already but it was news to me. While I

The Importance of Documenting

Figure 1: Attribution: By Lvcipriani (Own work) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons As I mentioned in my previous post (“A New URL for My Old Blog” … if you haven’t checked it out yet…go do it…I’ll wait…), I have started blogging again using emacs and org2blog after a long hiatus (the last actual post that wasn’t just a re-post of a link was two years

A New URL for My Old Blog

Figure 1: Attribution: Ian D. Keating (via CC Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0) Well, here we are again! You may have noticed that I’m reporting to you from a new URL (https://bradfonseca.com/) There is a mildly interesting story related to this change that I thought I would share here. I recently read an article on John Scalzi’s blog called “20 Years of Scalzi.com”. In

Google shutting down XMPP interoperability is a sad sign of the age of communication silos

Edit (2018-10-16): I just discovered that this blog and moved to a self-hosted website: https://blog.psy-q.ch/ I’ve updated all the links in this post. Psy-Q’s Braindump Google just shut down the last piece of Google Talk, killing XMPP. This means that people using standards-based open and interoperable chat systems can no longer talk to their friends who use Google’s proprietary and closed chat system, Hangouts. For